Animal Symbolism  : Rams (Àgbò) are known to be resilient, self-willed, confident, headstrong, slow to anger...and a symbol of leadership, initiative and determination. " Rams  are refuted not to fight often, but when they do, they engage the enemy fiercely...therefore,  they symbolize the restraint necessary in a good ruler, as well as aggression and perseverance..." 

Animal Symbolism: Rams (Àgbò) are known to be resilient, self-willed, confident, headstrong, slow to anger...and a symbol of leadership, initiative and determination. "Rams are refuted not to fight often, but when they do, they engage the enemy fiercely...therefore, they symbolize the restraint necessary in a good ruler, as well as aggression and perseverance..." 

Àníké-Àgbò, Àníké Agbo, Àgbò t'on fi orí ti òpó...

Àníké-Àgbò, Àníké Agbo, Àgbò t'on fi orí ti òpó...

ORÍKÌ & SELF-EXPRESSION

An Oríkì(s) is an attributive name, accompanied with a corresponding praise/self-affirmation poetry, chanted to “” (to activate) the “Orí" or awaken/nurture the creative self. 

 

Self-expression is the “act” or “activation” of the Orí through practices such as Oríkì; (a self-chosen medium of expression/artistry)


Oríkì (Background)

In the Yòrùbá culture, seven (7) days after the birth of the newborn, the elder(s) deliberate and conclude on a name (Oríkì: Àníké) befitting the essence of the newborn, with an accompanying praise poem/rhyme with metaphoric attributions (Àníké-Àgbò), specially formulated and chanted thereafter to constantly re[mind] the newborn of “who s/he is created to be;” particularly as a reference when faced with situations in the future, that question one's Being or existence. 

Animal metaphors (characteristics of the animal: Àgbò/Ram) are often used within the body of the rhyme to describe the person. Below is the Oríkì  of the founder of Àníké,  with an attempt to translate it:

 

ORÍKÌ: Àníké-Àgbò

Àníké Àgbò

Àníké with the personality of the Àgbò/Ram*

Àníké Agbo

Àníké of the Arena (where people gather)/Agbo

Àgbò ti o nfi orí ti òpó

The ram that forges ahead resiliently despite existing structures or obstructions such as Pillars or Totem poles/ (Òpó) 

Òpó M’Oja A ‘Lekàn

The Pillar, Mother of Fish (M’Oja/Omo Eja/Yemoja: Yeye Omo Eja)

Òpómúléró M’Oja A ‘Lekàn

The Sturdy Pillar of Strength, Mother of Fish

Òpó Ró Aso, Òpó Gbàjá

The Pillar that ties a wrapper (fabric/cloth) around/Ró aso ; Adds an extra Cloth (like a baby carrier) to further support (facilitate/nurture) the weight or load of others/Gbaja or Gbé Òjá

Òpó Kan Dudu, Keke Ta Didun

The Single Pillar, like the sound of the weaver's spindle

Aso Ni Èdìdì Omo Ènìyàn

 Clothes we human beings wear, tend to conceal, obstruct transparency, be deceitful and become a form of bondage/èdìdì

Bi Ko Ba Si Aso; Bi Ko Ba Si Èjìgbàrà Ìlèkè

Yet, without these Clothes, without the expensive double strings of waist & hip beads

Iniruuru Ìdí L’Aoba Maa Ri

The buttocks will be exposed

Omo Elomiran Ìbá Bo Ara Sile A Jo Àayà

Unlike you, Other’s de-robe and behold they’ll resemble the fast and playful Red Colobus Monkey

Imiran Ko Ba Bo Ara Sílè A Jo Òbo

Some others de-robe and behold resemble a plain monkey

ADDITIONAL self-proclaimed:

Èmi, Èmí, Èmími

I Am, A Life-giving essence, My life-giving essence

Àníké Àníké Àníké-Àgbò

*[Rams are pugnacious, combative, aggressive, belligerent, stubborn, slow to anger, bold, headstrong, self-willed & confident. The Ram symbolizes resilience in people and their relentless determination to forge ahead in spite of challenges encountered]